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May 30, 2017

Labyrinth at Buckhorn Inn One of Largest in U.S.

The Buckhorn Inn’s Rachael’s Labyrinth, at 60 feet in diameter, is one of the largest meditation labyrinths  in the United States.  It is built of local fieldstone, and is a unique feature of the Buckhorn Inn grounds. Peoples all over the world have been creating these structures since the Neolithic period.  They are marked by a symmetry that is visually pleasing and contain surprisingly long paths in a small amount of physical space.  They provide timeless beauty and an intriguing way for individuals to interact with the setting.  Some estimates claim that as many as 10,000 labyrinths may have been constructed all over the world in the last 25 years.  Today the terms “labyrinth” and “maze” often are confused.  A maze is complex, has many branches and dead-ends, and offers walkers various points of decision.  A labyrinth, on the other hand, is unambiguous with one route that always leads to the center.  As such, it is the perfect place to leave stress behind and renew one’s spirit in the tranquility of nature.  The Buckhorn Inn guests have often described it as a quiet haven and a respite from stress.  For more information on Rachael’s Labyrinth, please visit our website .  http://www.buckhorninn.com/grounds/rachel’slabyrinth

Rachael’s Labyrinth at the Buckhorn Inn

 

How to do a simple walking meditation in a labyrinth

  1. 1.  Stand at the entrance.  Center yourself with a few deep breaths.
  2. 2.  Begin to walk, concentrating on the sensations of the placement of your feet and the rhythm of your breath.  If you are stressed, you may find that walking at a slow pace will help to quiet your mind.  As outside thoughts enter your mind, acknowledge them, then bring your mind back to the present sensations of walking.  3.Upon reaching the center, pause for a moment of quiet reflection.  4.  Walk out, appreciating the sense of calm.  

     

    Your journey through the labyrinth begins with your first step.

May 24, 2017

Red Velvet Cake has Roots in History

Dinner guests at the Buckhorn Inn on May 30 will enjoy Red Velvet Cake for dessert.  My personal history with this treat began when I was a child.  Then it was known as “$200 Cake”.  As the story I heard goes, a guest at the Waldorf-Astoria in New York City enjoyed her dessert so much that she asked the chef for the recipe.  She received the formula and instructions,  and $200 was added to her bill.  She protested, but the chef replied that since she had seen the recipe, she must pay for it.  She paid the bill, but exacted revenge by printing cards and passing out  “the secret recipe” on New York City buses.   This story may or may not be true, but we do know a bit of the history of Red Velvet.  Velvet cakes, so called because cocoa powder or cornstarch was used with the flour  to create a fine-textured product, had been around since the 1800’s.  But it was during the 1940’s  that the Adams Extract company from Texas used point-of-sale recipe cards featuring their butter flavoring and red food coloring.  The recipe spread from Texas throughout the South.  During the era of WWII food rationing, boiled beet juice was used to give the cake its brilliant coloring and help retain moisture.  The dessert was popular at state fair baking contests and other bake-offs.   A cameo role in the 1989 film “Steel Magnolias” put this treat firmly in the modern spotlight.

Frosting on the Cake

The  Red Velvet Cake  I remember from my childhood featured a boiled milk and flour frosting, called an ermine.  It was very light and fluffy, but also very time-consuming to prepare.  That may be one of the reasons that cream cheese frosting is the current favorite go-with.  Whatever its origins, Red Velvet Cake truly is a delight!  For a peek at our ever-changing menu, please visit http://BUCKHORNINN.COM/DINING/WEEKLY-MENU.  

Red Velvet Cake