swoosh

social icons Email Signup:Go

Gatlinburg Weather

Find more about Weather in Gatlinburg, TN
Click for weather forecast

Blog

head_about3

head_about4

head_ground_a

head_about2

July 31, 2017

Hikes in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Many of our guests spend quite a few of the hours they have here hiking in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  One of our favorite trails for hikes is the one which leads to the Grotto Falls.  The Grotto Falls are the only falls in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park which you can walk behind!

Hikes to Grotto Falls are beautiful, especially in the morning.

The hike to Grotto Falls is very popular with Buckhorn Inn guests.

The Trillium Gap Trail leads to, and behind, the Grotto Falls.  The trail winds through old-growth forests and many large eastern hemlocks.  The path is wide and well-worn, but be careful of the rocks and exposed roots!  Be sure to wear sturdy shoes and bring water.  The Buckhorn Inn has hearty and delicious sack lunches available if you choose to take one on your hike.  The trail is a moderate climb.  The roundtrip to the Falls and back takes about 2-3 hours.   During the hike you will cross four small streams.  In the springtime watch for the blooms of white and yellow trillium, white violets, and Dutchman’s breeches.  The Dutchman’s breeches are so called because the flowers resemble men’s trousers hanging by the cuffs on a clothesline.

Hikes on the  Grotto Falls trail feature many spring wild flowers.

White trillium are plentiful in the spring on the hike to Grotto Falls.

The Grotto Falls cascade down 25 feet.  The Great Smoky Mountain National Park has all the elements for beautiful waterfalls–ample rainfall and an elevation gradient.  In an average year, the mountains receive more than 85 inches of rain.  The rain trickles, then rushes down the mountainsides, cascading beautifully onto the large boulders below.  

Directions to Grotto Falls for Hikes

From the Parkway in Gatlinburg, turn at light number 8.  Follow the Historic Nature Trail into the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  Take the Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail to the large parking area near stop number 5.  You will see a sign for the trailhead.  For more information on planning your hike, visit http://www.nps.gov/grsm/planyourvisit/grotto-falls.htm  Happy hiking!

July 24, 2017

The “Other” Bebb, the Architect Brother of Douglas

Our guests often ask us questions about Hubert Bebb.  He was the architect brother of the Buckhorn Inn’s original owner, Douglas Bebb.

Hubert Bebb was the brother of the inn's original owner, Douglas.

Hubert Bebb was the architect for the Buckhorn Inn, built in 1938.

Hubert was born in Illinois but worked in Tennessee for the majority of his career.  When Douglas and Audrey Bebb bought 25 acres near the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Hubert began work on the plans for an inn.  He took advantage of the views, situating the neo-classical style inn so guests could enjoy Mt. Leconte, Trillium Gap, Brushy Mountain, and Winnesoka Knob.  The inn was called the “Mt. Vernon of the Smokies” for the colonnade which was modeled after Mt. Vernon.

Hubert Bebb’s work helped to shape the way Sevier County looks today.  His work stands out by the seamless combination of modernist ideas and regional materials.  His designs respect their surroundings.  For example, his steep roof lines mimic the shape of the mountains behind his buildings. http://www.tennesseeencyclopedia.net

Bebb’s Education

He studied architecture at Cornell University and bolstered his understanding of native materials by studying mine engineering in Colorado.  He studied under Frank Lloyd Wright in Illinois.  The young architect worked on designs for the 1933 Chicago World’s Fair.  On that project he worked with his good friend Nathanial Owings who founded the firm Skidmore, Owings, and Merrill. 

In Tennessee, the architect created the viewing tower for the Clingman’s Dome Overlook.  His design ensured that the tower is accessible by all.  His design for the Arrowmont School of Arts & Crafts won a 1973 Award of Merit from the American Institute of Architects.  Natural air drafts feed the kilns at Arrowmont.  Late in his career, Bebb designed “A Monument to the Sun, the Source of All Energy” for the 1982 Knoxville World’s Fair.  The tower remains one of the most recognizable parts of the Knoxville skyline.

July 17, 2017

Famous Guests at the Buckhorn Inn

What do you have in common with former Second Lady Tipper Gore and with the late actress Patricia Neal?  You all have been treasured guests at the Buckhorn Inn!

Tipper Gore and Patricia Neal are among the Buckhorn's famous guests

The Buckhorn Inn has hosted many important guests, including you!

Tipper Gore was a Buckhorn Guest

Tipper Gore served as the Second Lady of the United States from 1993 to 2001.  She was encouraged to visit the Buckhorn by our regular guest Lucia Gilliland, a member of her staff.  Longtime friends of the Gores, Lucia served as an official advisor to them in the White House.  Her husband, Jim, served as Chief Legal Counsel for the Department of Agriculture.   As related in the book The Buckhorn Experience, Tipper came during her husband’s time in office.  Therefore she brought with her a round-the-clock coterie of secret service officers as well as several staff members and every level of law enforcement.  At the time the only internet connection at the Buckhorn was in the kitchen.  So every morning Tipper’s chief of staff came down in his pajamas, set up his computer on an ironing board, and got to work.  No word on whether the breakfast chef slipped him any special treats!

Tipper is an author, photographer, and social issues advocate.  You will see the lovely letter she wrote to us framed in the Buckhorn Inn office.  For more on Tipper Gore’s current work, please visit http://www.tippergore.com.

Patricia Neal also Enjoyed the Buckhorn Inn

Born in Kentucky coal country, Patricia Neal grew up in Knoxville and attended Knoxville High School.  She was known as Patsy Louise Neal back then.  She began to go by “Patricia” when she began her long and successful acting career in New York City.  She never forgot her Tennessee roots, once saying “We Tennessee hillbillies don’t conk out that easy”!  She won a “Best Actress” Oscar in 1964 for Hud in which she played opposite Paul Newman.  In 1978 the Patricia Neal Rehabilitation Center opened at the Fort Sanders Regional Medical Center.  The center cares for patients suffering from disabilities and such traumas as stroke and spinal cord injuries.  Patricia visited the center in Knoxville every year until her death in 2010.  The Buckhorn Inn served as a wonderful escape for Patricia.  The Inn was a place where she could relax, drink in the calmness, and revisit the natural beauty she so loved about Tennessee.

July 11, 2017

Meet the Other Mrs. Mellor

The Mellor Family got lucky 30 years ago when the second Mellor son Jack married Indiana native Sharon Galbreath. We are are so happy that Jack and Sharon have left ttheir corporate careers in Chicago to take  up permanent residence at Buckhorn. Sharon has been making herself very useful around the Inn already and many of you have met her at breakfast, dinner or on check-out. She styles herself as “the daugther-in-law” and loves to talk about food, one of her passions.

Sharon and Jack lived for the past 36 years in greater Chicago area. A Certified Association Executive, most of Sharon’s career has been focused on national, nonprofit dental and medical organizations.  Her work history includes: Associate Executive Director of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Foundation, Executive Director of American Academy of Periodontology Foundation, and most recently CEO of the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation (OREF). At OREF we funded more than $2 million of research each year, providing medical researchers with the data and mentoring they needed to go on to large-scale funding. Sharon says that she “ took a great deal of satisfaction in working with donors and other stakeholders to grow the pool of researchers whose work ultimately will provide breakthroughs in patient care.”

Sharon earned a BA from Purdue University, MBA from Loyola University and a PhdD from Union Institute and University.

Sharon currently serves on the Board of Directors of a nonprofit called CreatiVets which helps veterans with PTSD develop coping tools by helping them express themselves through music, the visual arts and creative writing. She is a member of MENSA and has served on their national public relations advisory board. Sharon is also a member of the John Purdue Society and cheer on my beloved Boilermakers!

See Summer Flowers in the Smokies

Many guests ask us when is the best time to see rhododdendron and mountain laurel in bloom. Well, it depends–mostly on the elevation. Here at Buckhorn where our elevation is about 1600 feet, May is a great viewing tiime. But up in the mountains, July is the best time. There are many other summer wildflowers besides these two perennial favorites in bloom right now, including the beautiful jewelweed shown left. The Great Smoky Mountains Association recommends several good viewing spots. 
         Low Gap (from Cosby to Low Gap) – Crimson Bee Balm, Rosebay Rhododendron, Wood Nettle, Pale Jewelweed, Canadian Violet, Pipsissewa, Common Elderberry, Loosestrife, Galax, Basil Bee Balm, White Clover, Wild Hydrangea and Blackberry.
         Appalachian Trail (From Low Gap to Mt. Cammerer Trail) – Blackberry, White Clover, Mountain St. John’s Wort, Loosestrife, Galax, Wood Nettle, Wild Hydrangea, Flame Azalea, and Partridge Berry.
         Mount Cammerer – Galax, Rosebay Rhododendron , Wild Hydrangea and Blackberry.

July 10, 2017

Arts & Crafts of the Smokies

The Arts & Crafts Community was established in 1937.

More than 100 artisans can be found in the Arts & Crafts Community.

The Buckhorn Inn is fortunate to be located in the Great Smoky Arts & Crafts Community.  Established in 1937, this community is the largest group of independent artists in North America.  The 8-mile loop features more than 100 shops.  There visitors can watch the artisans at work and browse their creations.  Many of the artists specialize in traditional Appalachian arts.  You may pronounce it “Ap-pa-LATCH-a” as many locals do, or “Ap-pa-LAY-cha” as is the case  in many other parts of the country.  Regardless, it is the birthplace of many unique arts and crafts.  

Background of Arts & Crafts in the Smokies

The people of the Smoky Mountains have been described as self-sufficient, creative, and inspired by the natural beauty around them.  Practical items used everyday have taken on the role of folk art by virtue of the excellent craftsmanship and elegance of design.  Folk art typically is defined as works that are artistic but also have practical use.  Crafts, on the other hand, are items usually produced for a practical use but are decorated.  Sometimes solely practical items become objects of art by being repurposed.  
Examples might be jugs used for decoration or rugs used as wall hangings.    Traditional Smoky Mountain arts & crafts include painting, woodworking, and weaving.  This area also features glassblowing, basket weaving, and metal working.  The community has shops focusing on pottery, leathercraft, and broom making.  Many of the artists in our community are second- and third-generation artisans.  They use traditional methods that have been passed down to them.  These traditional pieces are finding a resurgence of popularity.  Many collectors appreciate the timeless quality of uniquely handcrafted works.  They look forward to handing down these treasures to future generations.  

The Gatlinburg Convention center will host the Great Smoky Arts & Crafts Community Thanksgiving Show from November 21-26.  The Holiday Show will be held from November 27-December 3.

Thanksgiving and Christmas Arts & Crafts shows are right around the corner.

Be sure to visit the Gatlinburg Arts & Crafts shows.

For more information on the shows please visit http://www.GatlinburgCrafts.com  Please watch this blog as we feature some of our artistic neighbors!

 

July 3, 2017

Solar Eclipse Will Happen on August 21

Where will you be when the sun goes out?  The Great Smoky Mountains National Park reports that the guided trip to Clingmans Dome for the August 21 solar eclipse already is sold out.  The park can provide information on other viewing areas http://www.nps.gov/grsm/planyourvisit/2017-solar-eclipse.htm

The solar eclipse against a dark sky is a magical sight.

The August 21 total solar eclipse will be visible in our area.

 

Some Fun Facts About The Solar Eclipse:

  1. Prussian astronomer, Friedrich Bessel, developed the complex mathematical formula for predicting solar eclipses in 1824.
  2. The speed of the moon as it moves in front of the sun is approximately 1,398 miles per hour.
  3. Total eclipses cannot be seen from either the North Pole or the South Pole.
  4. The Citizen Cate (Continental-America-Telescope-Eclipse) Experiment has enlisted scientists from 60 sites across the country to film the eclipse.   When edited together, the film will be the longest video of an eclipse ever recorded.  It is expected to help investigators research the corona which normally is invisible.
  5. In Mark Twain’s 1889 book “A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court” the protagonist saves himself from being burned at the stake by predicting a solar eclipse in the year 528.
  6. One of the most memorable eclipses in filmdom is the crucifixion scene in “Barabbas” which was filmed during an actual eclipse in February 1961.
  7. The Science Fiction Writers of America named Isaac Asimov’s “Nightfall” the best story written prior to 1965.  The plot revolves around pending darkness in a world perpetually in sunlight.
  8. The sun is about 400,000 times brighter than the full moon.  Be sure to invest in special filtered glasses to preserve your eyesight.
  9. Venus should be visible to the upper right of the eclipsed sun.  
  10. The sun’s diameter is about 400 times larger than that of the moon.  But because of the distance between the sun and the moon, both appear approximately the same size when viewed from Earth.
  11. Total solar eclipses are rare.  One can be viewed from somewhere on Earth about every 18 months.

Happy viewing!

July 2, 2017

Ice Cream Summer at the Buckhorn Inn!

In 1984 President Reagan declared July the official National Ice Cream Month.  At the Buckhorn Inn we are going further by celebrating this delicious treat all summer long!  

Buckhorn Inn dinner guests will enjoy special ice cream desserts all summer long!

July is National Ice Cream Month!

The International Dairy Foods Association reports that ice cream was enjoyed as far back as the 2nd century B.C.  The “ice cream” of the time was snow and ice flavored with honey and nectar.  Marco Polo brought a recipe for a frozen treat from the Far East back to Italy about a thousand years later.  In the 16th century, Charles I of England was a fan of “cream ice”.  Lore has it that he provided the royal maker with a life pension in return for keeping the recipe a secret.  In fact, royals around the world kept this delicacy to themselves.  However in 1660 a café in Paris made a frozen blend of cream, milk, butter and eggs available to the general public for the first time.  

The Oxford English Dictionary reports that one of the first recipes for a frozen cream and sugar dessert in North America appeared in Hannah Glasse’s The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy in the late 1700s.  http://www.archive.org/details/artcookerymade02glasgood  Later records show that George Washington spent roughly $200 on ice cream during the summer of 1790.  That was a large sum at the time–and most of us would agree that was a good expenditure!  The invention of insulated ice houses around 1800 enabled the industrial production of ice cream.  Today the United States produces more than 1.6 billion gallons of frozen dairy desserts a year!

Special Ice Cream Desserts at the Buckhorn Inn

July 4 dinner guests at the Buckhorn will enjoy Chef Bob’s special creation, Strawberry Smoothie Cake!  Upcoming menus will feature more delicious and decadent ice cream desserts like Mud Pie, Grasshopper Pie, and Peach Melba Pie.  Keep an eye on our ever-changing menus to see the special desserts we are featuring all summer long!  http://www.buckhorninn.com/dining  We look forward to welcoming you to celebrate with us!

What could make these peaches even more delicous?  Ice Cream!

Delectable fresh peaches are the star of Peach Melba Ice Cream Pie.