swoosh

social icons Email Signup:Go

Gatlinburg Weather

Find more about Weather in Gatlinburg, TN
Click for weather forecast

Blog

head_about3

head_about4

head_ground_a

head_about2

September 4, 2017

Buckhorn Neighbor: G Webb Gallery

One of our favorite depictions of the Buckhorn Inn is by our neighbor, G Webb.

Our neighbor, G Webb, created this lovely picture of the Buckhorn.

Prints of “Buckhorn Inn” are available in our gift shop.

The painting captures the timeless charm of the Inn, and includes our beautiful views.  

The G Webb Gallery is on Buckhorn Road

Virginia born, G Webb grew up in Nashville, TN.  By age 10 he already was an avid painter.  In 1971 he opened his first gallery in Murfreesboro, TN.  However, once he began painting the beautiful mountain scenery in east Tennessee, he knew he was “home”.   His scenic watercolors convey a sense of the serenity he feels in this part of the country.  G’s work focuses on landscapes, mountainscapes, mountain heritage, and historical sites.  G and his wife Vickie are the proud parents of Cami Monet, a talented water colour artist in her own right.  Their gallery on Buckhorn Road showcases the art of both father and daughter.  You can find more details at http://www.gwebbgallery.com.  Both original watercolors and limited edition lithographs are available at the gallery.

What is a Lithograph?

Lithography was invited in 1796 by the Alois Senefelder in Bavaria.  Essentially, an oil-based image is put on the surface of a smooth sheet of limestone.  Then a gum Arabic solution is applied to the surface.  The solution only sticks to the non-oily surface.  During printing, water is attracted to the gum Arabic parts and repelled by the oily surfaces.  The oily ink used for printing does the opposite.  A refined method of this technique is still used for fine art prints today.  The process for fine-art prints was enhanced around 1816 and was used by such artists as Delacroix in the 1820’s.  Goya produced his last series by lithography and during the 1870’s such artists as Degas began producing most of their art by lithography.

The G Webb Gallery is on Buckhorn Road, a short distance from the Buckhorn Inn.  They are a proud member of the Great Smoky Arts & Crafts Community.  The next time you visit us, we encourage you to spend an afternoon exploring the 8-mile craft loop.  We have maps showing the locations of some of our favorite artist galleries and artisan shops.

August 21, 2017

Buckhorn Neighbors: Buie Pottery

One of the oft-asked questions from our guests is where we got the charming little pottery lamps on our tables in the dining room.  

We get many compliments on our decor, incluiding our pottery lamps.

These pottery lamps add to our table scape.  

These lamps were created by one of our neighbors in the Great Smoky Arts and Crafts Community, Buie Pottery.  Buie began throwing pottery when she was only 17 and has been enjoying “slinging mud” every since!  She earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree from the University of Tennessee.  She opened her studio and gallery in 1986.  Her stoneware pieces are colorful, functional, and very attractive.  http://www.buiepottery.com

Each of these handmade pottery lamps is different.

These lamps were created at Buie Pottery.

A Primer on Pottery

It is one of the oldest human art forms.  Some pieces have been identified as being from the pre-Neolithic period.  Ancient vessels and figurines have been recovered from all over the world:  China, Russia, Japan, Sub Saharan Africa, and South America.  Pottery is durable, so shards and pieces have survived long after other materials have broken down.  By examining these objects, archeologists learn much about the daily life of a particular culture.  

Creating Pottery

Before the objects are formed, the clay must be kneaded to ensure that water is evenly distributed throughout the object.  Then air trapped within the clay is removed.  Then objects are formed from the prepared clay by hand-forming or by throwing on a potter’s wheel.  The clay can also be molded or machine-shaped.  The object is then heated to high temperatures in a kiln to remove the water.  The resulting object is hard and strong.  

Pieces may be decorated before, or after, firing.  Some of the main means of decoration are painting, glazing or carving.  Colored clays or other additives may be worked into the clay to create different textures and effects.  

Watching a potter at work is fascinating.  We encourage you to stop by one of the local artisan studios on the Arts & Crafts Loop the next time you visit us.

 

August 14, 2017

Buckhorn Neighbors: The Brown Farm and Its Bison Herd

I first became fascinated by bison when, as a child, I read Robert McClung’s 1960 book Shag, Last of the Plains Buffalo.  The story of the magnificent beast’s struggle against drought, famine, and hunters made a lasting impact on me.  Imagine my delight to realize that a herd resides only a little more than a mile from the Buckhorn Inn!

Bison are being brought back from the edge of extinction.

The bison herd now numbers seven.

Locals know Benny Hammonds as the longtime Gatlinburg-Pittman high school football coach.  In 2013 he purchased 3 bison cows and one bull.  A recent birth puts the size of the herd at seven now.   To visit The Brown Farm, turn right onto Buckhorn Road from Tudor Mountain Road.  Drive a little more than a mile (the road turns into #454) and you will see the farm on the left.  There is no admission charge and there is parking.  Be careful–the fence is electrified.

Status of American Bison

The American Bison (also sometimes called American Buffalo) is the largest surviving land animal in North America.  During the 19th and 20th centuries the creatures were hunted nearly to extinction.  An estimated 50 million bison were slaughtered for sport.   They are no longer listed as endangered, but their future is not assured.  According to the National Bison Association, http://www.bisoncentral.com, it is mainly through the efforts of small farmers, like Mr. Hammonds, that the animals are being preserved.

The bison may be seen through an electrified fence.

This baby bison came right up to the fence to greet me.

They may appear peaceful and nonchalant, but bison can charge without warning.  Both males and females have horns and can use their massive heads as battering rams.  They can gallop at speeds near 35 mph and typically weigh around 2,000 pounds, so you can imagine the momentum they can establish.

They are herbivores and prefer to eat grass and sometimes sedges.  Early mornings and evenings are often the best times to see them be active.  They rest during the day and graze during the morning and evening hours.

They like to roll in depressions in the dirt–a behavior called “wallowing”.  Wallowing may help them cope with biting insects and to self-regulate their body temperatures.

We hope you get a chance to visit these magnificent creatures.